An ultimate Pro Touring build! Built LS7, T56, Detroit Speed chassis 657 hp at 6,700 rpm Massive amounts of subtle changes Multiple time magazine car Fresh and ready to race Check out this article from Car Craft: Remember those games in kids’ magazines where you try to spot the differences between two pictures? Bob Bertelsen’s ’71 Camaro would be great for the car guy’s version of this game. There’s not a body panel on it that hasn’t been re-formed, modified, or otherwise massaged, but most of the changes are so subtle, without a stock example sitting next to it, they escape the eye. That exemplifies what Bob does as a car builder. He works with the original design, and without trepidation, crafts it into the vision of how he sees the car in his mind. Bob is not a professional car builder, although he certainly possesses the ingenuity and capability it takes to be among the best in the business. Most importantly, he lacks that mental block that most of us have-the one that mocks us, saying, “You aren’t capable of doing that!” Take, for example, the roof of his Camaro. Bob wanted to integrate design cues of a fifth-gen Camaro into the car, including a 12-inch-wide recess in the roof panel. Most people who don’t do professional metal-fab work would shun the idea, and even quite a few pros would be hesitant to launch into such an endeavor. Not Bob. He dove in, starting by rolling two 3/8-inch tubes and adhering them to the roof to create a basic structure and shape. He then cut out the 12-inch-wide section and crafted a new centersection. He didn’t get the consistent arch he wanted the first time, so he modified his metal stretcher, welding a socket to the tool and using a torque wrench to modulate a consistent torque applied to the stretcher. He welded the recessed section into the roof for a subtle enhancement that looks so natural that many people don’t even notice it.

Solon, Ohio, United States